Executive Summary

Here you’ll find the Executive Summary of studies done pertaining to the EnergyPlex Park. For more details on specific sections, download the full Executive Summary or visit pages linked within sections for more in-depth details.

Download Executive Summary
Cultural Resource Study
No indicators, such as aeolian (blow sand) sand dunes, abundant shinnery oak, or abundant mesquite are in the project area. There is some evidence of pre-1964 homesteading in section 5 of T18S, R37E including a small family cemetary. For more information, see Fatal Flaw and Reconnaissance Cultural Resource Survey.
Reconnaissance Biological Study
EnergyPlex Park is home to several species of plants and animals. None of the plants found are considered rare or protected. The Park is home to some 26 species of birds, 8 species of mammals, and 2 species of reptiles. Most species of birds fall under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act. Recommendations include scheduling land clearing outside of traditional breeding season. For more information, download entire Executive Summary.
Phase 1 Environmental Site Assessment
EnergyPlex Park is located primarily on former agricultural land. In the past, it has been used as rangeland as well as limited oil and gas development. There are no indications of anything prohibiting development. For full details, see Phase 1 Environmental Study.
Soils and Minerals
Much of the surface of the High Plains is underlain by aeolian and alluvial deposits of the Ogallala Formation and has a resistant caliche caprock. For more information, download entire Executive Summary.
Geology/Seismology
The Park and the Hobbs, NM area has primarily sedimentary deposits and is located north east of the Mescalero Ridge, which is the western escarpment of the Southern High Plains. There are no quaternary faults or folds in southeast New Mexico/West Texas. For more details, download entire Executive Summary. 
Air Quality/Wetlands
There are no major pollutants in Lea County and EnergyPlex Park has no wetlands.
Climate/Weather
Lea County has a semi-arid climate with warm summers and cool, dry winters. Average rainfall is 14.6 inches, occuring usually May through October.
Infrastructure/Utilities
EnergyPlex Park can be accessed through several roadways including NM 483 and access to NM 18 is planned to connect the two across the park. A two-mile rail spur is planned to connect the Park to the Texas and New Mexico Railway shortline which connects to the Union Pacific in Texas. Utilities to the site may include water, sewer, electric, fiber optic, and natural gas. For more information on utilites, please see Existing Infrastructure.
Demographic information
Eunice Hobbs Jal Lovington Tatum Lea County
Total Population 3,210 44,044 2,179 15,059 1,189 68,062
Female Population 1,511 21,330 1,077 7,425 584 35,027
Male Population 1,699 22,714 1,102 7,634 605 33,035
Total Households 1,438 16,564 1,013 5,244 649 24,898
Median Age 37 32 41 29 40 32

For more demographics, see Demographics.

Drainage Study
Approximately 100 acres are designated Zone AO according to the Federal Emergency Management Agency Flood Insurance Rate Map. The rest of the property is designated Zone X. For more information, see Drainage Study.